Saturday, May 22, 2010

Santa Rita da Cascia



O Dio che nella tua infinita misericordia, ti degnasti di guardare con amore alla tua fedele ancella Rita e di concedere alla sua mediazione quanto è impossibile agli sforzi umani, alle previsioni del mondo e dell'ingegno, muoviti a pietà di noi e soccorrici nelle nostre necessità. Fa' che tutti conoscano che tu solo sei la ricompensa degli umili, la difesa degli abbandonati e la forza di tutti coloro che in te confidano. Amen. (Pater Noster, Ave Maria, Gloria)










St. Rita of Cascia:

Born at Rocca Porena in the Diocese of Spoleto, 1386; died at the Augustinian convent of Cascia, 1456. Feast, 22 May. Represented as holding roses, or roses and figs, and sometimes with a wound in her forehead.

According to the "Life" (Acta SS., May, V, 224) written at the time of her beatification by the Augustinian, Jacob Carelicci, from two older biographies, she was the daughter of parents advanced in years and distinguished for charity which merited them the surname of "Peacemakers of Jesus Christ". Rita's great desire was to become a nun, but, in obedience to the will of her parents, she, at the age of twelve, married a man extremely cruel and ill-tempered. For eighteen years she was a model wife and mother.

When her husband was murdered she tried in vain to dissuade her twin sons from attempting to take revenge; she appealed to Heaven to prevent such a crime on their part, and they were taken away by death, reconciled to God. She applied for admission to the Augustinian convent at Cascia, but, being a widow, was refused.

By continued entreaties, and, as is related, by Divine intervention, she gained admission, received the habit of the order and in due time her profession. As a religious she was an example for all, excelled in mortifications, and was widely known for the efficacy of her prayers.

Urban VIII, in 1637, permitted her Mass and Office. On account of the many miracles reported to have been wrought at her intercession she received in Spain the title of La Santa de los impossibiles. She was solemnly canonized 24 May, 1900.

American Catholic:

Like Elizabeth Ann Seton, Rita of Cascia was a wife, mother, widow and member of a religious community. Her holiness was reflected in each phase of her life.

Born at Roccaporena in central Italy, Rita wanted to become a nun but was pressured at a young age into marrying a harsh and cruel man. During her 18-year marriage, she bore and raised two sons. After her husband was killed in a brawl and her sons had died, Rita tried to join the Augustinian nuns in Cascia. Unsuccessful at first because she was a widow, Rita eventually succeeded.

Over the years, her austerity, prayerfulness and charity became legendary. When she developed wounds on her forehead, people quickly associated them with the wounds from Christ's crown of thorns. She meditated frequently on Christ's passion. Her care for the sick nuns was especially loving. She also counseled lay people who came to her monastery.

Beatified in 1626, Rita was not canonized until 1900. She has acquired the reputation, together with St. Jude, as a saint of impossible cases. Many people visit her tomb each year.

Although we can easily imagine an ideal world in which to live out our baptismal vocation, such a world does not exist. An “If only ….” approach to holiness never quite gets underway, never produces the fruit that God has a right to expect.

Rita became holy because she made choices that reflected her Baptism and her growth as a disciple of Jesus. Her overarching, lifelong choice was to cooperate generously with God's grace, but many small choices were needed to make that happen. Few of those choices were made in ideal circumstances—not even when Rita became an Augustinian nun.

Quote:

For the Baptism of adults and for all the baptized at the Easter Vigil, three questions are asked: “Do you reject sin so as to live in the freedom of God's children? Do you reject the glamour of evil, and refuse to be mastered by sin? Do you reject Satan, father of sin and prince of darkness?”

Patron Saint of:

Difficult marriages
Impossible causes
Infertility
Parenthood

SQPN:

* Margarita of Cascia
* Rita La Abogada de Imposibles
* Saint of the Impossible

Memorial

* 22 May

Profile

Daughter of Antonio and Amata Lotti, a couple known as the Peacemakers of Jesus; they had Rita late in life. From her early youth, Rita visited the Augustinian nuns at Cascia, Italy, and showed interest in a religious life. However, when she was twelve, her parents betrothed her to Paolo Mancini, an ill-tempered, abusive individual who worked as town watchman, and who was dragged into the political disputes of the Guelphs and Ghibellines.

Disappointed but obedient, Rita married him when she was 18, and was the mother of twin sons. She put up with Paolo’s abuses for eighteen years before he was ambushed and stabbed to death. Her sons swore vengeance on the killers of their father, but through the prayers and interventions of Rita, they forgave the offenders.

Upon the deaths of her sons, Rita again felt the call to religious life. However, some of the sisters at the Augustinian monastery were relatives of her husband’s murderers, and she was denied entry for fear of causing dissension. Asking for the intervention of Saint John the Baptist, Saint Augustine of Hippo, and Saint Nicholas of Tolentino, she managed to bring the warring factions together, not completely, but sufficiently that there was peace, and she was admitted to the monastery of Saint Mary Magdalen at age 36.

Rita lived 40 years in the convent, spending her time in prayer and charity, and working for peace in the region. She was devoted to the Passion, and in response to a prayer to suffer as Christ, she received a chronic head wound that appeared to have been caused by a crown of thorns, and which bled for 15 years.

Confined to her bed the last four years of her life, eating little more than the Eucharist, teaching and directing the younger sisters. Near the end she had a visitor from her home town who asked if she’d like anything; Rita’s only request was a rose from her family’s estate. The visitor went to the home, but it being January, knew there was no hope of finding a flower; there, sprouted on an otherwise bare bush, was a single rose blossom.

Among the other areas, Rita is well-known as a patron of desperate, seemingly impossible causes and situations. This is because she has been involved in so many stages of life - wife, mother, widow, and nun, she buried her family, helped bring peace to her city, saw her dreams denied and fulfilled - and never lost her faith in God, or her desire to be with Him.

Born

* 1386 at Roccaparena, Umbria, Italy

Died

* 22 May 1457 at the Augustinian convent at Cascia, Italy of tuberculosis

Beatified

* 1 October 1627 by Pope Urban VIII

Canonized

* 24 May 1900 by Pope Leo XIII

Related Links:

Facebook support page

Saint Rita blog

Patron of Impossible causes

National Shrine

Catholic Encyclopedia entry

EWTN entry

Gravesite

Patron Saint of baseball?





Prayer to Saint Rita:

Holy Patroness of those in need, Saint Rita, you were humble, pure and patient. Your pleadings with your divine Spouse are irresistible, so please obtain for me from our risen Jesus the request I make of you: {mention your petition}.

Be kind to me for the greater glory of God, and I shall honor you and sing your praises forever. Glorious Saint Rita, you miraculously participated in the sorrowful passion of our Lord Jesus Christ. Obtain for me now the grace to suffer with resignation the troubles of this life, and protect me in all my needs.

Amen.

5 comments:

Esther G. said...

Carlos, this is such a beautiful post!!

Carlos Echevarria said...

thank you Esther, I am glad you enjoyed it, best regards, aloha, we had victory in Hawaii!!!!

Ron Russell said...

Very nice looking blog Carlos. Should have gotten around to this earlier, but have added you to my blogrolls at http://gunsand bikinis.blogspot.com , http://totus-blog.blogspot.com , my primary blog and also at http://obamacartoon.blogspot.com. You do write some great post and also great comments---I enjoyed reading them--you are very well informed.

Jorge Rondón Santos said...

The fifth picture in your article is really Saint Mariana de Jesus Paredes y Flores, "The Lily of Quito" (* October 31, 1618 - + May 26, 1645). She was a hermit of the Third Order of Saint Francis (but she is depicted with the Jesuit habit, because her spiritual father was Fr. Hernando de la Cruz).

Jorge Rondón Santos said...

The fifth picture in your article is really Saint Mariana de Jesus Paredes y Flores, "The Lily of Quito" (* October 31, 1618 - + May 26, 1645). She was a hermit of the Third Order of Saint Francis (but she is depicted with the Jesuit habit, because her spiritual father was Fr. Hernando de la Cruz).